english history · history · Scottish History

Best Escapes from the Tower of London!

So I see you’re a prisoner, thrown into the Tower by order of the King/Queen. What are you in for? Were you a traitor to the crown? Did you fall out of royal favor? Or were you just in the wrong place at the wrong time?

Whether you are truly innocent or guilty or whether you are rich or poor; your fate will remain the same. You need to take matters into your own hands and plan an escape! The Tower of London may seem daunting. It may be a heavily guarded fortress surrounded by a moat, but over 40 prisoners have escaped over the centuries. Maybe you can learn a thing or two from them…

Here are some tips and tricks from the stories of four of the greatest escapes from the Tower of London: Continue reading “Best Escapes from the Tower of London!”

art history · history · Scottish History

A Study in Portrait: Charles Edward Stuart

Portraits and image have always been important for those of royal status in every part of the world, especially in European history. These portraits had to show their power, their status, and, in many cases, show that they are appointed by God/higher being. I used to study art history in university as well and portraiture was always the most interesting to me. I love to study people, their stories, and the legacy they wanted to leave behind. The way a person crafts their image in portraits is a way of creating their ideal legacy, even though it may not be the truest example. Since I was writing this on Outlander Sunday, I wanted to explore the portraiture of Charles Edward Stuart (aka Bonnie Prince Charlie) who I wrote a bit about in my Culloden post about two weeks ago (Inspired by Outlander: Culloden and its Aftermath ).  Continue reading “A Study in Portrait: Charles Edward Stuart”

history · Scottish History

Inspired by Outlander: Culloden and its Aftermath

It probably would not surprise anyone to know that I am a huge Outlander fan. The premiere of season three featured heartbreaking scenes from the battle of Culloden and its aftermath. Apparently, it took nine days of filming and over 1,000 extras to create those intense battle scenes, though they were only in the episode for the first few minutes. I am not Scottish myself, but part of Outlander the show and the book’s influence has peaked my interest in Scottish history. I would be very interested to visit the country and the site of Culloden myself one day.

But my question today is, how did Culloden happen and how did Scottish culture change in its aftermath?

Continue reading “Inspired by Outlander: Culloden and its Aftermath”