biography · english history · european history · history

The Strength of Queen Katherine

In this post, I wanted to focus on Queen Katherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. With all the focus on Anne Boleyn, Katherine is typically remembered for her struggles later in life. She is remembered as the old, unattractive, stubborn woman who was being replaced by her young and vivacious lady in waiting. In reality, Katherine of Aragon was an extremely strong woman, a very popular queen and a role model for many of her subjects. She was intelligent and educated. She was also loyal to a fault. She was born of Queen Isabella (who was the queen of Castile in her own right) and King Ferdinand. She was trained for queenship since she was a toddler and prepared entirely for her role as a leader. She was integral to the success at the Battle of Flodden. It is easy to see why she remained popular with England’s subjects even after the King had decided to put her aside.

Queen Isabella was ruler in her own right of the Kingdom of Castile (located in today’s modern Spain). Katherine’s mother was a good example of a powerful Christian ruler during the 15th/16th centuries. With her marriage to King Ferdinand of Aragon, Spain was united for the first time. The co-rulers were focused on boosting the power of Spain and they wanted to become the Catholic powerhouse in Europe. A lot of their reign was dedicated to the campaign of conquering more land and booting the “heretic” Moors (the Muslim population living in Spain) out of the kingdom. In modern eyes, this looks terrible as they viewed those of other religious faiths/backgrounds as inferior and intruders, but this is what they felt their duty was as good Christian subjects. Katherine grew up in this environment of war and strong Catholic values. Queen Isabella also ensured that all her children were well educated. This is out of care, but also likely to help the image of Spain and win advantageous marriages.

September 8, 1505 – Catherine of Aragon Writes to Her Father - Janet Wertman
Young Katherine of Aragon

Katherine’s marriage to Prince Arthur of England was arranged when they were both children. Henry VII was feeling insecure on the throne (remember, the Tudor dynasty was actually very new and Henry VII had taken the throne by force from Richard III and the former Plantagenet dynasty just some years earlier). If they could make an alliance with the strong and established Spanish kingdom, then this could boost their legitimacy. To Spain, they would be gaining an ally against France (the other Catholic powerhouse in Europe). Katherine of Aragon was said to be very beautiful. She had red-gold hair, fair skin, and exhibited a grace that was looked for in queens. She was raised always knowing she had a destiny to be Queen of England and she knew one day she would leave Spain (likely to not return).

Katherine and Arthur married as teenagers (Arthur was 15 and Katherine was 16) , but Arthur died within a year. Both Katherine and Arthur caught the same deadly sickness, but Katherine was the only survivor. The young widow was left stranded in a strange land with her destiny unclear. The alliance that was forged with their marriage also seemed almost dead in the water unless something could be done to mend it. Katherine likely expected to be sent back home, where her parents would be able to find a new husband for their young daughter. Yet, in England, Katherine had a bit more freedom. Those in the Spanish court were raised with a strict etiquette code, but rules were a bit more relaxed in England and the clothing more relaxed as well. Katherine, when she was queen, would have power in this society. Did she really want to leave and have to go back to her childhood home?

Negotiations started between Katherine’s family and Henry VII about possibly marrying his second son, Prince Henry (who was now the heir). Henry VIII in his younger years was fit, handsome, athletic, and charming (contrary to his later years, where injuries had left him almost immobile and a possible head injury may have affected his personality). He loved to hunt and excelled in tournaments. He would become extremely popular. There was a big question though, was Katherine’s marriage with Arthur consummated? This could cause issues with the legality of a new marriage with her former brother in law. If she did, then the pope would likely not approve the new marriage. Katherine was haunted by this question her whole life (especially when Henry VIII had tired of her), but she continued to claim that their marriage was never consummated. Even on her death bed, she still held firm. She was likely telling the truth as she was a god fearing woman and would likely not lie just before her death.

Prince Henry and Katherine already had created a bond. Henry looked up to Katherine in a way and, as he grew up, it seems Katherine fell in love herself. Henry turned to her for comfort and advice. When Katherine’s mother died though (during the negotiations), Spain was no longer united which gave Henry VII pause. Katherine was left in a limbo for years. During this time, she was treated extremely harshly by her former father in law. He cut her allowance during these “negotiations” which left her in a very difficult situation. She no longer had money for food, for new clothing, or to pay her ladies who came with her from Spain. She led a difficult life during this time and had to go into debt in order just to feed herself/her household and obtain the basic necessities. Even her father ignored her letters. She was left on an island while the men debated the fate of her life. She could not even go and experience freedom at the English court, instead she was basically a prisoner. Yet, she persevered through this knowing that she still had a destiny. She was born to be a leader. She wrote frankly to her father about her situation. She worked hard to try to get the necessities that she and her household needed. It was not just about her. In 1507, her father actually appointed Katherine as his ambassador to England. She was the first female ambassador in European history! Her father through their correspondence believed in his intelligent daughter to act in his stead. Finally, her position in the English court was raised and she would not get pushed around by Henry VII’s continued attempts at manipulating her. Through this experience, she gained more knowledge of the ways of politics and showed her strength as a leader. It is easy to see why young Prince Henry greatly respected her early in their relationship.

As she continued to wait for a decision on her fate, she continued to be treated harshly. This lead to fighting within her household, money troubles, depression, and bouts of sickness. It was not until Henry VII’s deathbed that he gave permission for Katherine and Henry VIII to finally be free to wed.

A very young Henry VIII, shortly after his coronation

There was a five year age gap between the two. Katherine was 23 years old (old for an unmarried woman in 16th century standards) and Henry was 18. The new King and Queen seemed to be bringing the onset of a golden age. A new Camelot was awakened for the populace. Both of their rulers were very young and beautiful, they seemed very much in love, and the court was always active in showing off their wealth with dazzling pageants, parties, etc. Queen Katherine took a great interest in education and was an avid reader of the Scriptures and philosophy. She would help to financially support universities. She worked hard to learn English (which had been difficult for her at first) and was very pious. She went to mass daily which was a source of strength for her. She was the model Queen of the era.

Early on, Katherine of Aragon was very involved in matters of state and would often give advice to the King. Henry VIII would insist that Katherine be involved and he needed her opinion on matters first before decision was made. Naturally, Katherine used this power to bolster the Spanish interests (basically an anti-France policy). Henry VIII wanted her approval on his actions which shows his admiration of her. In 1513, Henry VIII took his army on campaign to France and leaves Queen Katherine as regent in his stead. There have been some examples of Queens taking the regency while their husbands were away, but not many. This really showed the trust that Henry VIII had in his wife.

Within a month of Katherine’s regency, James IV of Scotland declared war and invaded England. The Scots saw their chance with an absent King and army. This was her chance to really show her leadership. Katherine took a very active role in the preparations to defend her adopted nation. It seems from some of the letters that Katherine enjoyed and relished the challenge she was faced with. The Queen, with her councilors, mobilized troops to form a defense force, she contacted local governments to determine how many men and horses would be provided, and provided strict deadlines. Their country was being invaded and there was no time to waste. She took control of the financial aspect. She (likely with the help of councilors) calculated and provided the proper funding for supplies, artillery, etc. This may not seem so shocking to the modern eye, but at the time this was very unusual for a woman to be so involved in the male dominated arena. Yet, Katherine had the example of her mother who took great part in the wars in Spain. Did she think of her mother at this time and use her example for her own leadership?

Queen Katherine did not just do the bare minimum in this case either. She even left the safety of London and rode north behind her troops. She brought with her over 1500 sets of armor. She kept the spirits of her men high and gave a rousing speech to the reserve army. She likely reminded them that they were to defend their nation and that the English strength and courage was superior to all. Though the reserve army never did have to actually fight. The main force quickly defeated the Scots at the Battle of Flodden. King James IV himself was killed in action. This was a great victory for England and for Queen Katherine who was the acting regent. She sent a piece of the James IV’s bloody surcoat to her husband in France (she actually wanted to send James IV’s head, but that was not possible). She wrote proudly to King Henry regarding the English victory. Katherine was born into a world where she grew up seeing women heavily involved in battles, so this was finally her chance to take up where her mother left off. Despite being a “model” type Queen of the era, Katherine was not meek or a coward. She was strong and would not accept defeat. Even later in life, when she faces one of the most difficult battles of her life, she would not go down without a fight. Katherine was already popular with the people before this, but her success as regent likely cemented it even more.

The Spanish Princess': Why the Story of Catherine of Aragon at Flodden  Matters | Telly Visions
Interpretation of the Battle of Flodden by Starz’s series, The Spanish Princess. Quite a few liberties were taken with regards to historical accuracy, but her passion and spirit are illustrated here.

Katherine of Aragon biggest failure ( in the eyes of the contemporary court ) was her “inability” to give birth to a son. In 1511, Katherine did give birth to a son, Prince Henry, who died just days later. She would go on to have (estimated) about 6+ pregnancies in a very short amount of time. Only one living child resulted, the Princess Mary. This took a huge toll on Katherine physically and mentally. She proved to be a very devoted mother to Princess Mary and one can only imagine how painful it must have been to lose more potential children.

Mary Tudor - Death, Facts & Husband - Biography
Young Princess Mary

Even worse, it also caused the King’s displeasure. This caused Katherine great stress that induced sickness. She turned to religion more and more during this time, even fasting to the extreme (which likely did not help with her pregnancies either). To our modern eyes sometimes it is difficult to understand Henry’s obsession with having a son. Yet, as stated earlier, it is easy to forget that the Tudor dynasty was still very new. His own father had just conquered and taken the throne from the previous dynasty (who still had supporters out there). A son was crucial to secure this dynasty his father began. Henry began to turn to his advisor Cardinal Wolsey more and more. Katherine’s father also betrayed England and Henry began to look more towards a French alliance. All of these matters combined marked the end of Katherines up close involvement in government. Despite these setbacks, Katherine still maintained the decorum of the Queen, she was always loyal and kept her head held high.

Catherine of Aragon - Wikipedia
Later Queen Katherine

By the time Anne Boleyn came around, the Queen had aged rapidly. The stress of her daily life and the multiple pregnancies took a toll on her looks. She stood in great contrast to the young King just hitting the prime of his life. Yet, Katherine continuously held the popular favor with the people. Anne Boleyn was never really liked by the people of England. This is evident in her own coronation where the onlookers looked on in complete and eerie silence or when she was attacked by a mob of angry women. Queen Katherine looked and behaved how the ideal medieval monarch should be. She was respected and she was a role model. Despite being bullied and threatened to abdicate her position, go into a nunnery, or “tell the truth” of her wedding night, she always maintained that she was Henry’s true wife and the true Queen of England. She was born for this and no one was going to take this away from her. To her, Anne Boleyn was nothing. Even when Henry “annulled” his marriage and broke from the Catholic Church of Rome she would not accept it. As a result, she was treated terribly and was banished to homes with minimal staff. She was barred (even at her deathbed) from seeing her only daughter, Mary. That had to have been so upsetting and so depressing that likely any person would have just stepped down. Yet, even on her deathbed (she likely died of cancer) she still declared she was Henry’s true wife and the true queen. She did always believe that Henry would come back to her. Despite the abuse she faced from him and the poverty she was subjected to yet again, she always showed the utmost respect to the King.

Through the Tudor obsession in the media, Katherine is always looked at as the dowdy old woman who was set aside. Yet, she was actually much different than that. She had an inner strength, determination, and leadership skills that made her stand out as Queen.

Sources:

Weir, Alison. Six Wives of Henry VIII

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/when-catherine-aragon-led-englands-armies-victory-over-scotland-180975982/

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/letters-papers-hen8/vol1/pp997-1012

https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-Flodden

https://www.historyextra.com/period/tudor/battle-flodden-battlefield-scotland-scottish-invasion-guide-facts-dates/

https://heroinecentral.wordpress.com/tag/battle-of-flodden-field/

Ancient History · art history · Asian History · history

Women and the Evolution of Writing

I started to learn Japanese a couple months ago. It has always been something I wanted to do, but I had never really had the motivation until now. I have always wanted to travel to Japan and that is one of my main goals in studying the language (it is also something to look forward too once the COVID pandemic has died down). I believe it is really important to learn at least some parts of the language and culture of the place you want to travel to. It will enrich the overall experience.

One important part of studying Japanese is familiarizing oneself with the writing system. A combination of three different systems are used: hiragana, katakana and kanji. I wanted to know more about why three systems were used, so I began to research. To my surprise, I actually discovered a very interesting piece of women’s history.

To give a brief overview of the three types of writing systems (note: I am not an expert as I am still learning myself). Kanji developed first and is adapted from Chinese characters. These symbols are used to represent entire words. Hiragana and Katakana use characters to represent the 46 sounds used to make up Japanese words. Each character is a syllable.

Japanese Writing, A Beautifully Complex System — Smashing Magazine
Examples of the different forms

As stated above, Kanji was the first writing form to be developed. In medieval Japan, only elite male members of the imperial court could use this form of writing. All official documents were written in Kanji and (like most places in the world at the time) politics was the domain of men. Women were not allowed an education in writing as they did not belong in the public sphere. Based on the standards of the era, women would never have a place in the government of their country. Without the ability to write, there was no way for women of medieval Japan to express themselves. Yet, the women of the Japanese court were innovators.

The women developed onnade (“Women’s Writing”) which was an early form of the modern kana (hiragana, katakana). The origin of this name was obvious as it was very popular for women to use this writing system. They used onnade to express themselves through poetry, letters/personal correspondence, and literature. There were many female novelists who came from this era. The most famous was Lady Murasaki Shikibu. She wrote The Tale of Genji in the early 11th century (which has been considered the world’s first novel). Lady Murasaki was an imperial lady-in-waiting and a noblewoman who used the onnade to compose this work. The Tale of Genji centers around a charismatic fallen prince and recounts his adventures ( and lovers). Besides Lady Murasaki, there were many talented women in the court around the same time such as Sei Shonagon, Izumi Shikibu, and Akazome Emon. All of the women during this period took something (writing, in this case) that had been taken away from them and made it their own. They created art and spread ideas around the court.

The Tale of Genji — a radiant collection of art inspired by the world's  first novel | Financial Times
Lady Murasaki

Naturally, this writing system was looked down upon by the male members of the court. Those who were part of the education system and those of society’s elite felt that the only the Kanji they used on official documents meant anything. Yet, eventually, the kana became more popular as it was easier and filled in the gaps of the language that Kanji left out. This was especially important for male novelists as the centuries went on. Japanese women of the medieval period took action to form their own ways of communication. They filled in any gaps that their lack of education produced. .

It was not only in Japan that women helped to influence the development of language/writing. Women in the west also had a hand in developing their local vernaculars. In medieval Europe, Latin was the language of the church and other official documents. As the fad of courtly romance rose, many noble women began to commission books written in the “common” tongue (not Latin) as it was easier for them and a wider range of the population to understand. This even included a famous women’s health text that was translated into many “common” tongues (English, French, German, Italian, Dutch, etc) , so more women could better educate themselves about their body and reproductive health. This was titled “The Trotula”.

GIRLBOSS MOOD: Little is known about the Japanese author, Murasaki Shikibu  credited with writing the… | Japanese art, Japanese painting, Japanese  woodblock printing

As I learned more about how the Japanese writing systems were developed, I was pleasantly surprised to find that women actually developed many of the writing systems that are used today. In 1900, an official writing system was established in Japan using hiragana, katakana and kanji. This is what is seen today. Based on my research, it seems that the original hiragana had many more symbols, but the amount was reduced to help create a more streamlined system. These stories fascinate me as it shows that even though women were denied the education they deserved, and were blocked from exchanging ideas through the written word, they became innovators and developed their own way of communication. They did not need to follow the “status quo” had already been set out for them.

Japan Travel Tips: 8 Things I Wish I'd Known Before Going to Japan | LIVE  JAPAN travel guide

Sources:

https://beyond-calligraphy.com/2013/03/22/the-beauty-of-inefficiency-a-story-about-traditional-hiragana/

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jun/26/saving-woman-hand-the-artist-rescuing-female-only-writing

https://medium.com/pomme-de-terre/the-sexist-history-behind-the-development-of-hiragana-e9f5676ab1f9

https://www.languagemagazine.com/2017/12/08/rise-women-birth-languages/

https://www.britannica.com/place/Japan/The-Heian-period-794-1185#ref168070

https://www.cnn.com/style/article/japan-kana-shodo-women-calligraphy-hnk-intl/index.html

American History · english history · history

When Christmas was Banned…

The holidays this year have been a struggle. Many did not even expect the holidays would have been affected when the pandemic started in March . Gatherings will be smaller or over video chats and the holidays will not feel like the big event that they have usually been. Yet, it also gives us sometime time to focus on the things we are grateful for. Christmas could never truly be cancelled, right?

Well, actually, Christmas has been banned in previous centuries. It was banned in both the United Kingdom and early America. In 1647, Parliament decreed that Christmas was no longer considered a feast day or a holiday. This was under the rule of Parliament/Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell, who was placed in power as a result of the English Civil War and the beheading of Charles I. This regicide brought the Puritans (some of the most extreme Protestants) to the forefront of politics. Puritans believed that the whole celebration and overindulgence of the season was wrong. To them, there was nothing in the bible that stated there should be a celebration like this on December 25. In fact, the date December 25 originates from a pagan festival (the date of the winter solstice) which was just adapted to the Christian rhetoric during the early medieval era. The bible was the word for the Puritans and they had a strict adherence to it. Christmas should be like any ordinary day. There would be no large feastings, merry making, rowdy behavior, drinking to excess, decorations (idols), or any other “sinful” activities. They also disliked these traditions as they felt that the Catholic influence was still too strong on the Church of England.

Oliver Cromwell | eHISTORY
Oliver Cromwell

Shops/taverns/inns were forced to stay open on Christmas day, it was illegal to attend a specific Christmas service, singing carols was forbidden and Christmas food/decorations were seized if they were found. Actual soldiers were sent to break up these large gatherings and these services. Parliament even met that day and continued on as usual. Prior to this ban, Christmas was celebrated similarly to how it was today. People had the day off, families would travel and get together, presents were given, and decorations were made. It was also a time for leisure for the working class and it was an opportunity to overindulge in foods, alcohol, romance, etc. Some of these celebrations when on for 12 more days after Christmas. Yet, as the Puritan faith began to become more popular, this was looked upon as sinful, disgraceful, and very similar to Catholicism (which was a stigma they had been working so hard to remove ). It was not until the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 with Charles II that Christmas was “unbanned”.

Medieval Festive Facts: How Was Christmas Celebrated In The Past? -  HistoryExtra
Christmas Celebrations

I had heard about the banning of Christmas in England before I started my research, yet I did not know it was also banned in early America (New England to be specific). Puritans had also settled in the colonies in order to achieve the religious freedom that they desired. In 1659, the government of the Massachusetts Bay colony banned Christmas. Again, they felt the celebration of Christmas was a distraction from the true word of God and that it was sinful. This feeling was so strong that it really was not until the 1840s that Christmas, as a holiday, was universally accepted in New England. People who were caught taking the day off were sent back to work and those found participating in such activities were fined. The fine was even larger for those found gambling.

Yet, laws were made to be broken. As you might imagine, many were not happy with the new rules in either country. In England, Pro-Christmas riots began to occur. The most famous occurred in Canterbury where crowds of people began to damage the shops that had opened on Christmas day which then snowballed into them taking control of the entire city. This actually led to a larger rebellion against the new government (under Cromwell) in 1648. In 1647, there was a riot on Christmas day which led to a protestor getting killed. He became a symbol that Parliament had “killed” Christmas itself.

In New England, many people were attempting to celebrate under the radar, which is why fines were imposed for these activities. I also read about a particular group, the Boston Anticks, who would go around each Christmas and perform bawdy shows (especially in wealthy homes) for money. This group was apparently very annoying and very disruptive, yet were hard to identify because they were disguised. It was obvious they would perform these dramatic scenes on the “banned” Christmas day for more attention and, likely, profit.

When Massachusetts Banned Christmas - HISTORY

Yet, these bans actually helped to form the Christmas we know today and actually made the event more popular. With inns, bars, and taverns forced to stay open, the holiday actual became more social. Additionally, after the bans, the celebration of Christmas became more mixed with the religious and the secular. Charity became very important (especially in the Victorian era). Christmas became a time to give to the less fortunate. Those who did not have a family to spend time with or a feast to partake in.

Worth Reviving - Scrooge | The Movie Guys
Scrooge, Albert Finney , 1970

This Christmas will be difficult, but it is a time to be thankful for those in your life. I think this year we have learned that we take a lot for granted in our daily lives. We will just have to be creative and find different ways to celebrate , just like those who were affected by these Christmas bans.

Thank you again all for supporting my blog. I cannot wait to continue writing into the new year!

Sources:

https://www.historyextra.com/period/stuart/no-christmas-under-cromwell-the-puritan-assault-on-christmas-during-the-1640s-and-1650s/

http://www.olivercromwell.org/faqs4.htm

Christmas in Early New England, 1620-1820: Puritanism, Popular Culture, and the Printed Word by STEPHEN W. NISSENBAUM, 1996

https://www.historytoday.com/archive/christmas-19th-century-america

https://www.history.com/news/when-massachusetts-banned-christmas

New England Living Today, ” How the Puritans Banned Christmas,” by Heather Tourgee • December 19, 2019 

https://thehistoryofparliament.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/parliament-and-christmas-during-the-civil-war/

American History · art history · history

Fashion Statement: The Bloomer and its Impact on the Women’s Movement

While doing research for my series on the suffragist movement in the United States, I came across a very interesting trend that was briefly popular during the mid-19th century. Elizabeth Smith Miller debuted the “Bloomer” costume in 1851 . Miller was working in her garden and became irritated when her long and heavy skirts got in the way of her work. As she was now thoroughly fed up, she decided to take a pair of scissors and cut the skirt to a shorter version. Underneath the skirt, she would wear a wide pair of trousers which allowed her more comfort and freedom to complete her tasks. This outfit soon became a hit among the early feminists in the budding suffragist/women’s right movement. This new fashion trend pushed the boundaries of the feminine norms of society (despite being short lived) and it is easy to see why it became popular with suffragists. The Bloomer walked so future fashion trends of the 20th century could run. I really have never looked deeply into fashion history before, but it is fascinating how through this mode of art/expression women were able to convey what they wanted and resisted against societal norms.

Elizabeth Smith Miller wore her new outfit when she went to the Seneca Falls Convention and met up with her cousin, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton loved the look and others at the convention soon began to take notice as well. Most importantly, Amelia Bloomer (where the fashion trend took its name from) , who was the editor and writer of The Lily. The newspaper was dedicated to the women’s rights and temperance movements and was run completely by women. After meeting Miller, Bloomer began to write about how impressed she was by the invention and how she had adopted the style. She printed descriptions and instructions on how others could make the Bloomer. Eventually, the media was calling the style the “Bloomer Dress”, which shows how much influence she had on the trend.

Bloomers - Wikipedia
Bloomer

There was an article written in The Lily (by an anonymous writer) that was titled, “Do Women Ever Do Any Hard Work? (1854):

“Go into the towns, and you will see them serving customers in all kinds of stores- attending to, working at, and carrying on all kinds of trades, sorting and packing up all sorts of goods in factories and warehouses; they do all kinds of weaving, dyeing, knitting, spinning, and sewing of all kinds of articles in use; they work at the shoe trade, and not a hat made but they have a hand at it; some you will find, keep Post offices, teach school, and preach the gospel; others employ their time in doctoring, nursing, and attending on the sick; some you will find in Bake-houses, making bread and various other things made in such places; and in butcher’s shops I have seen them cut up carcasses equal to men, and for Barbers they can’t be beat. Others go out washing clothes, and brewing beer all day long, and which are very different operations to anything you see done here; besides a great many of them have to attend to their own house affairs as well; so that woman’s work is said to be never done; and now tell me. if you don’t work hard, who does?”

I quoted this article because most women during the 19th century did not sit around doing nothing all day. They did work and, if not in a workplace, it was at home. They had to raise children, run a household, do chores, etc. The clothing of the era was modest, heavy, and restrictive. The aim of women’s dress during this era was to accent their curves, but, as a result, comfort was forgotten. Women wore many layers of clothing. The first layer a bloomer, then a chemise, followed by the tight corset, a camisole to cover the corset, a petticoat, a large and awkward hoop skirt, the over petticoat and then, lastly, the blouse/bodice and skirt. As you can see, it would take very long to get dressed in the mid-1800s and, not to mention, difficult to move. After so many layers, a tight corset, and a hoop skirt it would be difficult to complete any task. Imagine attempting to sit down or bend over in a hoop skirt or walk up stairs with layers of skirts at your ankles. It made any physical activities difficult such as bike riding, gardening, and hiking. Not only was the clothing restrictive physically, but also restricted what activities women could participate in.

bloomers | The Vintage Traveler

The Bloomer, naturally, was an attractive option. The allowed more comfort, the ability to move more freely and participate in more activities. It also was a healthier option as the heavy use of corsets was not the best for the body. Part of the advertisement of the day was that it was good for women’s health.

The trend also was a statement. Women in trousers was unheard of and challenged the feminine norms of the time. It proved that women wanted more opportunities. Society had women trapped under the constricting social norms, no room for advancement outside of the house, and even trapped them in the acceptable clothing of the time.

Amelia Bloomer, Originator of the New Dress, 1842 | Amelia bloomer,  Fashion, Fashion history

In the end, the Bloomer phase was very popular with young bicyclists (especially in Europe) and early feminists, but the majority of women were not ready to take these steps. The media and public opinion made this difficult. The women who participated in the fashion statement were ridiculed and harassed. They were considered unfeminine and were viewed as resisting their own gender roles. They received so much backlash that within a few years many of the pioneers (Bloomer, Stanton, etc.) actually went back to the original style of long dresses. They did this, not because they had given up, but knew it was a distraction affecting the larger cause (votes for women, women’s rights to education and employment, etc.). Yet, Bloomers still made an important impact as fashion continued to be used to reflect a new type of woman throughout the 20th century.

In 1926, Coco Chanel came out with the original “little black dress”. Prior to the 20s, the color black was for mourning, so typically your everyday clothing would not contain this. Not only was the color different, but the style. It was very simplistic, it was short, yet elegant. It was also made for a majority of women to afford. It directly contrasted with the tight, restrictive, and over the top clothing from the prior century. The bobbed haircut was also paired with the new, liberating clothing style. It was another way to send a rebellious message. Women were ready to move past what society expected of them and take on their own destiny. At the time, despite its popularity, the bobbed hair was controversial. It was banned at certain establishments, like some schools, and highlighted as masculine in the media. It was paired with the image of an immoral woman.

Vogue featured Coco Chanel's LBD, or little black dress. | MakersValley Blog

In the 1920s/1930s, Chanel also designed the iconic tweed suit. She took inspiration from menswear and sportswear and then added a feminine twist. It was comfortable, but also gave a powerful look to the women who wore it. The style is still popular today. Women were beginning to take on new roles in the workforce and that was especially evident during World War II.

Why the Chanel Suit is So Iconic - The History Behind the Chanel Suit

During the 1940s, rationing was extremely important in order to contribute to the war effort. Every resource was needed for the soldiers overseas. This included fabric, which actually led to shorter hemlines on dresses and skirts. The clothing was similar and more utilitarian. Pants and jumpsuits became more popular as women now had to work in the factories, labs , government jobs, and even in the military to fill in for the men who were now overseas. This was an accepted “sacrifice” for the war effort, but proved that women were capable of much more than society previously allowed. The change in fashion responded to the change in the expectations, yet continued to hang on to the modern day. Women made a huge impact during this period and continued to fight for more opportunities in the future.

The 1960s brought about the miniskirt which corresponded to the rebellion of the youth during this period. The miniskirt was a direct contrast to their parents fashion and their parents expectations. With changes, such as the development of the birth control pill, women were sexually empowered for the first time. The invention of the birth control pill relieved women of another restriction in their lives. This restriction included the pressures to marry quickly and settle down, to be submissive, and to remain pure. Just like men, they could finally be liberated and make their own choices. The 1960s and the miniskirt, was an era of new freedom and pushback against the social norms of the 1950s for young women.

1960's mini skirts - Google Search | 1960s fashion, 60s fashion, Mod fashion

In the 1980s, the power suit became a very popular look. You can see the influence the Bloomer and the Chanel suit had on this look. Iconic features are the padded shoulders and oversized look of the outfit. The focus now was not on the fact that the wearer was a woman, but what she could achieve and bring to the workforce. The suit represented respect and power. Women wanted to break that glass ceiling and they wanted to be successful themselves. They wanted to compete in the workforce and climb the ladder in their careers. Yet, there were barriers (that women still face today) in the corporate world that put women down due to their gender. They may find challenges getting paid what they deserve, getting that promotion that they worked hard for, or even finding opportunities in general. The suit gave the confidence needed and they felt they were dressed for the part they wanted. The power suit represents the ambition that women had to really show what they could achieve.

Is power-dressing a thing of the past? Womenswear | Dazed
The Look Of Power: How Women Have Dressed For Success : NPR

I do not claim to be an expert on fashion history, but, prior to this research, I never really thought about how the way we dress often coincides and aides in the social movements of the period. Women used fashion as an outlet to express what they wanted and what was missing in their lives. Without the Bloomer, could the power suit have existed?

Sources:

https://vintagefashionguild.org/fashion-timeline/

https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/february-2017/clothes-as-historical-sources-what-bloomers-reveal-about-the-women-who-wore-them

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/amelia-bloomer-didnt-mean-start-fashion-revolution-her-name-became-synonymous-trousers-180969164/

https://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2018/02/bloomers-pantsuits-brief-history-womens-dress-reform/

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/women-and-pants-fashion-liberation_l_5c7ec7f7e4b0e62f69e729ec

https://www.bustle.com/articles/191181-how-women-have-used-fashion-as-a-feminist-tool-throughout-history

https://www.americahousekyiv.org/ah-blog/2020/2/12/american-fashion-trends-through-the-decades

https://history.howstuffworks.com/historical-figures/coco-chanel.htm

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/why-coco-chanel-created-lbd-180965024/

https://www.vogue.com/article/from-the-archives-ten-vogue-firsts

https://www.nps.gov/wori/learn/historyculture/amelia-bloomer.htm

https://www.historytoday.com/miscellanies/lily-liberty-amelia-bloomer-200

https://nhdcivilwarclothing.weebly.com/layer-by-layer.html

https://blog.makersvalley.net/history-of-the-little-black-dress

https://www.crfashionbook.com/fashion/a26551426/history-of-chanel-tweed-suit/

https://fashionista.com/2017/04/bob-short-haircut-hairstyle-history

https://www.designer-vintage.com/en/stories/chanel-suit

https://bellatory.com/fashion-industry/Fashion-History-Design-Trends-of-the-1040s

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20140523-short-but-sweet-the-miniskirt

https://www.per-spex.com/articles/2019/3/17/the-importance-of-the-1980s-power-suit

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/12/the-power-suits-subversive-legacy/549200/

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/pill-mrs-america-womens-roles-1950s/

American History · biography · history

Timeline of Women’s Suffrage : 1848-1920. Part 2

See Part 1 : historynavigator.org/2020/09/03/timeline-of-womens-suffrage-1848-1920-part-1/

New Women

Today in history…27 February | english3batz

The turn of the century brought about a new era of suffragists. The previous generation attempted to fight for their suffrage rights while still trying to fit into the roles that society made for them. They wanted to fight for progress, but also could not afford to stand out in ways that may look badly on the cause as they would lose support. For this reason, the old generation of suffragists did not encourage street speaking, marches, or acts of civil disobedience. Victoria Woodhull (a woman who I profiled two years ago: historynavigator.org/2018/06/18/victoria-woodhull-first-female-presidential-candidate-and-activist/ ) was a woman ahead of her time and was a very popular figure. She was bold and headstrong. She even announced her candidacy for president in 1870 (prior to women receiving the vote!). Woodhull was a divorcee and lectured about women’s rights and their sexual freedom. It was the free love portion and her spiritualism beliefs that cause the suffragists to want to disassociate from Woodhull’s brand. They knew that this would be a discouragement to any politician who may have sided with their cause. Society was not ready to accept women’s suffrage AND their sexual freedom. Just like with the temperance movement, the women of the older generation were still very concerned with appearances despite their activism.

Yet, in the wake of the 20th century, the world was changing. In Great Britain, the “suffragettes” were making loud scenes to get what they wanted. The suffragettes held parades, gave speeches, performed skits, participated in hunger strikes , and , sometimes, even performed acts of violence. American suffragists, like Harriot Stanton Blatch (daughter of Cady Stanton) , traveled to Great Britain and were influenced by what they saw there.

Continue reading “Timeline of Women’s Suffrage : 1848-1920. Part 2”
American History · biography · history

Timeline of Women’s Suffrage : 1848-1920. Part 1

Last week, we celebrated the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in America. It is an amazing milestone to hit and to honor, but, on the other hand, it is shocking to think that the female citizens of this country have only had the right to vote for one hundred years. There are so many stories, people, and events that went into the long fight for the 19th Amendment, but in these next two posts I have compiled the events and stories that I feel were most important and encapsulated the movement.

Seneca Falls Convention, July 1848

 The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 sparked the women’s suffrage movement in America. The event was organized by five women: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Mary M’Clintock, Martha Coffin Wright, and Jane Hunt. It took place in the small town of Seneca Falls, New York. This convention was an early introductions, worldwide, of the concept of women’s suffrage. But how did this convention suddenly come about?

The abolition of slavery was one of the first political movements that women participated in and were able to exercise political agency. Beginning in the 1830s, American women were speaking out against slavery in public lectures. A woman’s role, during this period, was to be stowed away in the “private sphere”. They were to be dutiful wives and take care of the children.  Being regulated to the household, women never had a chance to reach out further and participate in the public sphere. They were barred from taking an active role in politics. To society, their opinions were unimportant. After a woman married (which was expected of them) they would lose any few freedoms they had and were dependent on their husbands. Married women had virtually no property or financial rights and the option of divorce was near impossible. The ideal “True Womanhood” of the period was a wife/mother who was pious and submissive. By the eyes of the law, women were dependents rather than a true citizen.   

Continue reading “Timeline of Women’s Suffrage : 1848-1920. Part 1”
American History · biography · history

Arrested for Voting: Susan B. Anthony’s Fight for Suffrage

August 2020 marks 100 years since the 19th Amendment was passed. This amendment provided women with the right to vote in the United States. It is hard to believe that it was not until 1920 that the female citizens of America received a right that should have been automatic as a citizen of the country. This right is often taken for granted today and it can be difficult to imagine a time when a woman would actually be arrested for voting in an election! It is important to remember this anniversary and to remember how hard the women who came before us fought. They fought so we could participate in government and in the decision making of this country. It is critical that we exercise this right every opportunity we have. During August (and likely the months beyond), I would like to highlight some of the tactics the suffragettes used to have their voice heard, famous standouts, and highlight how much hard work was put into the movement.

Continue reading “Arrested for Voting: Susan B. Anthony’s Fight for Suffrage”

biography · english history · history · Scottish History

Battle of Bannockburn and Robert the Bruce (Part 3)

Part One ( The Great Cause (Part 1) )

Part Two ( William Wallace’s Rebellion (Part 2) )

In 1297, the Robert the Bruce was 22 years old. In part 1 of this series, his grandfather (also named Robert Bruce) was one of the contenders for the Scottish throne but lost to John Balliol. The Bruce family was still one of the most powerful Scottish families and were determined to see their claim to the throne fulfilled. They sided with Edward I when the first rebellions broke out.  This was because they refused to back their rival John Balliol and hoped others would support their claim. Now, the young Robert Bruce, against the wishes of his father, decided to join the Wallace’s rebellion in 1297. In 1298, Bruce was named Guardian of Scotland. His rival, John Comyn (the nephew of John Balliol), was also named co-Guardian. The men disliked each other and again were beginning to split into factions, just like their previous relations. Yet, despite these factions, in 1302 Edward received oaths of allegiance from all parties. Was young Robert the Bruce going to honor this oath?

Continue reading “Battle of Bannockburn and Robert the Bruce (Part 3)”

biography · english history · european history · history · Scottish History

William Wallace’s Rebellion (Part 2)

In part one of this series (The Great Cause (Part 1)), Edward I had forced the Scottish nobles and their King to swear an oath of allegiance to him as their “overlord”. As he believed he had finally subjugated Scotland, the English king attended to affairs in other parts of his kingdom. After the betrayal of John Balliol and a failed rebellion, Edward I completely occupied Scotland. He sent soldiers to ensure his rule would continue. The people of Scotland were taken advantage of and abused under this military occupation. Scotland needed a new champion to take up their cause for freedom. Their nobles had failed them with their infighting and military defeats, so it was time for one of their own to pick up his sword.

William Wallace’s background is hazy and was thought to be the son of a minor feudal lord in Renfrewshire or Ayrshire. He seems to have grown up with military training which contributed to his later success. He was a very tall man . He was over six feet when the average male height was about 5’6” (though this physical characteristic was highly exaggerated in legends). Walter Bower (author of  the Scotichronicon) describes him as having “a certain good humour, had so blessed his words and deeds with a certain heavenly gift, that…he won over to himself the grace and favour of the hearts of all loyal Scots.” Bower also described him as “fair in his judgments”, compassionate, patient, and a skilled orator. Yet, English sources would describe him as “a vagrant and a fugitive”, a “bloody man”, and “a chief of brigands” (Morris, pg 303).

Continue reading “William Wallace’s Rebellion (Part 2)”

english history · european history · history · Scottish History

The Great Cause (Part 1)

This month I was supposed to be travelling to Scotland with one of my best friends. Scotland has been a dream trip of mine for a while, but it seems 2020 had other plans for me and so many others in similar situations. I hope to re-schedule, but, in the meantime, I would love to share some Scottish history in a new three-part series. This series will focus on the First Scottish War of Independence (1296-1328). This was a time that was filled with fascinating characters, intriguing military battles, and cunning tactics. On the English side, we have Edward I, “The Hammer of the Scots”. Edward was one of the strongest monarchs in English history, but also has a reputation of being a tyrant. Later, his weaker son, Edward II, will struggle to carry on his father’s legacy. There are some familiar names on the Scottish side such as: William Wallace and the legendary King Robert the Bruce. Along the way there will be a sprinkling of minor characters, including a brilliant sneaky re-capture of Edinburgh by Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray. I am greatly looking forward to this series and I hope it will provide an interesting read!

The Lothians - East, West & Midlothian | VisitScotland
A photo of Edinburgh, which was our travel destination (https://www.visitscotland.com/destinations-maps/edinburgh-lothians/)

In 1286, Alexander III of Scotland died and ended what had been considered a golden age of the Scottish kingdom. At 45 years old, King Alexander decided to risk it all and take a dangerous ride through a stormy night in order to spend the night with his new young bride of twenty-two years old. The next morning, he was found dead at the rocks at the bottom of a cliff. It was a disaster for Scotland as Alexander III had survived all his children and his new young wife had not yet produced an heir. With the throne up for grabs, powerful factions began to form which threatened the stability that had been a constant in the prior Kings reign. The main players were John de Balliol and Robert Bruce (senior, his grandson will become the more famous Bruce). Rebellion and civil war threatened Scotland due to the succession crisis and infighting between the two factions.

Continue reading “The Great Cause (Part 1)”